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Today In Black History

1741*
Succession of suspicious fires and reports of slave conspiracies created hysteria in New York in March and April. Thirty-one slaves and five whites were executed.


1797*

Olaudah Equiano dies in London without ever getting to see Africa again.


1856*

Henry Ossian Flipper, the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was born in Thomasville, Georgia. Enduring heavy racism during his schooling, Flipper went on to establish a military career. This was ended however after he was falsely accused of embezzling funds.


1878*

Jack Johnson Born: Mar. 31, 1878 Boxer controversial heavyweight champion (1908-15) and 1st black to hold title; defeated Tommy Burns for crown at age 30; fled to Europe in 1913 after Mann Act conviction; lost title to Jess Willard in Havana, but claimed to have taken a dive; pro record 78-8-12 with 45 KOs


1930*
President Hoover nominated Judge John J. Parker of North Carolina for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. The NAACP launched a national campaign against the appointment. Parker was not confirmed by the Senate.


1931*

Cab Calloway recorded "Minnie the Moocher"-the first jazz album to sell a million copies.


1948*

A. Phillip Randolph told Senate Armed Services Committee that unless segregation and discrimination were banned in draft programs he would urge Black youths to resist induction by civil disobedience.


1960*
Eighteen students suspended by Southern University. Southern Univerisity students rebelled March 31, boycotted classes and requested withdrawal slips. Rebellion collapsed after death of professor from heart attack.


1960*

Laurian Rugambwa of Tanzania becomes the first black Roman Catholic Cardinal.


1988*

Toni Morrison wins the Pulitzer Prize for her novel "Beloved"

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1864*
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1875*
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1915*
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1954*
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